Energy Transition Thursday #5: Demand Response

Circl

More and more electricity is being generated in the Netherlands with solar panels and wind turbines. In 2030 it is expected that even 70% of the total. That is sustainable, but also challenging. After all, the supply of wind and solar energy is just as erratic as the Dutch weather. How do we ensure that capriciousness and that the light just keeps on burning? Read more

More and more electricity is being generated in the Netherlands with solar panels and wind turbines. In 2030 it is expected that even 70% of the total. That is sustainable, but also challenging. After all, the supply of wind and solar energy is just as erratic as the Dutch weather. How do we ensure that capriciousness and that the light just keeps on burning?

Demand Response is one of the options to meet this challenge. Demand Response means that the demand for electricity becomes as flexible as the supply. Is it cloudy for a while, and is there less solar power? Then companies also reduce their consumption, so that there is no shortage of electricity. Are there large spikes in supply, for example, because there is a strong wind? Then companies also step up a gear.

By applying Demand Response, network operators do not have to replace the entire electricity network with thicker cables, which saves a lot of money. Companies that make their consumption flexible can actually generate an extra income stream. Demand Response is therefore not only a technical solution, but also an economic opportunity.

Demand Response is already being used, for example for pumping stations, but what does it take to apply this technique on a large scale throughout the Netherlands? What are the obstacles and opportunities for us?

Come to Circl on 19 March and join the conversation! For more information, visit: https://circl.nl/programma/energy-transition-thursday5

Gustav Mahlerplein 1B, 1082 MS Amsterdam